Daal — yellow, red, brown or black — is a staple across India. It is often described, inadequately, I think, as lentil soup. Except it's so much more. Arash James Iravan/Getty Images hide caption

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Katsu curry: The British navy brought its anglicized interpretations of Indian cuisines to Imperial Japan in the 19th century. By the end of the century, the Japanese navy had adapted the British version of curry. Alpha/Flickr hide caption

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Across India, several Christian communities prepare sweet homemade wines for the festive season from a rich array of local fruit, roots and grain. Above, a glass of golden pineapple wine. Courtesy Merwyn Mascarenhas hide caption

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Kolkata now has its first food truck: Agdum Bagdum. Its owners, two foodies who quit pharmaceutical jobs to become food truckers, were inspired by America's food truck craze — which, of course, was inspired by street food in places like Kolkata. Sandip Roy for NPR hide caption

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America's Food Truck Craze Parks On The Streets Of Kolkata

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A 16th century woodcut shows the interior of a kitchen. In medieval Europe, cooks combined contrasting flavors and spices in much the same way that Indian cooking still does today. Paul Lacroix/Wikimedia hide caption

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At Calcutta's famous New Market, vendors do brisk business in fruitcake as Christmas approaches. Sandip Roy for NPR hide caption

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A Punch Line In The U.S., Christmas Fruitcake Is Big In Calcutta

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