Ian Burkhart prepares for a training session in Columbus, Ohio. To move muscles in Burkhart's hand, the system relies on electrodes implanted in his brain, a computer interface attached to his skull, and electrical stimulators wrapped around his forearm. Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Technology Helps A Paralyzed Man Transform Thought Into Movement

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/473821367/474120958" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

By increasing the amount of serotonin in the spinal cord, an experimental drug helps nerve connections work better. Bee Smith/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

toggle caption Bee Smith/Ocean/Corbis

A Drug Might Heal Spinal Injuries By Sparking Nerve Growth

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/368058568/368282951" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Kent Stephenson, a research participant at the University of Louisville's Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, has his level of muscle activity and force measured by Katelyn Gurley. Courtesy of the University of Louisville hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of the University of Louisville