Nick Dupree arrives at the Federal Courthouse in Montgomery, Ala. on Feb. 11, 2003. His success in getting the state to continue support past age 21 enabled him to attend college and live in his own home. Jamie Martin/AP hide caption

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Jamie Martin/AP

Nick Dupree Fought To Live 'Like Anyone Else'

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Gregoire Courtine, a neurologist at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, holds a silicone model of a primate's brain with an electrode array. The goal is to pick up signals from the brain and transmit them to the legs. Alain Herzog/EPFL hide caption

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Alain Herzog/EPFL

Monkeys Regain Control Of Paralyzed Legs With Help Of An Implant

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Robert Gaunt tests Nathan Copeland's ability to detect touch by tapping fingers on a robotic hand. UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences hide caption

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UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences

Brain Implant Restores Sense Of Touch To Paralyzed Man

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Austin Beggin (left) and Tim Flynn. Both men suffered neck injuries that left them paralyzed. Courtesy of Shelly Beggin; Courtesy of Kerry Sheridan hide caption

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Courtesy of Shelly Beggin; Courtesy of Kerry Sheridan

After Paralysis, A Life Of 'A Different 10,000 Things'

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It took a team of delighted friends and family to help Florida engineer Matt Bellina (center) get back on his surfboard this summer after his severe spinal injury. The result? "I feel like I'm home," Bellina said. Courtesy of Diane Wehrell-Grabowski hide caption

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Courtesy of Diane Wehrell-Grabowski

Kelli Glenn holds a photo of her father while he was in the hospital. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Suddenly Paralyzed, 2 Men Struggle To Recover From Guillain-Barre

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Ian Burkhart prepares for a training session in Columbus, Ohio. To move muscles in Burkhart's hand, the system relies on electrodes implanted in his brain, a computer interface attached to his skull, and electrical stimulators wrapped around his forearm. Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images hide caption

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Lee Powell/The Washington Post/Getty Images

Technology Helps A Paralyzed Man Transform Thought Into Movement

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By increasing the amount of serotonin in the spinal cord, an experimental drug helps nerve connections work better. Bee Smith/Ocean/Corbis hide caption

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Bee Smith/Ocean/Corbis

A Drug Might Heal Spinal Injuries By Sparking Nerve Growth

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Sofia Jarvis, seen here with her family at a press conference in February, is one of several dozen children in California who have been diagnosed with a rare paralytic syndrome. It has left her left arm paralyzed. Martha Mendoza/AP hide caption

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Martha Mendoza/AP

Kent Stephenson, a research participant at the University of Louisville's Kentucky Spinal Cord Injury Research Center, has his level of muscle activity and force measured by Katelyn Gurley. Courtesy of the University of Louisville hide caption

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Courtesy of the University of Louisville

Sophia Jarvis, 4, of Berkeley, Calif., is one of the few children diagnosed with the polio-like disease, which left her arm paralyzed. She attended a press conference Monday at Stanford University with her dad, Jeff. Martha Mendoza/AP hide caption

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Martha Mendoza/AP