The underwater construction skills of the caddis fly larva have caught the interest of bioengineers. The larva tapes and glues pebbles together to form a sturdy protective case. Josh Cassidy/KQED hide caption

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Josh Cassidy/KQED
Frank Rossoto Stocktrek/Getty Images

From Medical Maggots To Stench Soup, 'Grunt' Explores The Science Of Warfare

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Plaster casts taken from soldiers' mutilated faces (top row), new sculpted faces (bottom row), and final masks (on the table) sit in the studio of Anna Coleman Ladd in 1918. American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution hide caption

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American Red Cross/Anna Coleman Ladd papers/Archives of American Art/Smithsonian Institution

One Sculptor's Answer To WWI Wounds: Plaster, Copper And Paint

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A cross-section of skeletal muscle in this light micrograph shows the individual, parallel muscle fibers (red). These fibers work in concert to power movement. Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/ScienceSource hide caption

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Thomas Deerinck, NCMIR/ScienceSource

Experimental Technique Coaxes Muscles Destroyed By War To Regrow

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