The University of Toronto's solar-powered pond aerator could help fish farmers in Bangladesh earn up to $250 of extra income a year. Courtesy of Powering Agriculture and University of Toronto hide caption

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Uber, Lyft And No More Loans: Twilight Is Here For Big-City Taxi Barons

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Researcher John Clements in the early 1980s, after he figured out that lungs need surfactants to breathe. David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF hide caption

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How A Scientist's Slick Discovery Helped Save Preemies' Lives

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Slum dwellers near Calcutta get their water from a municipal pipe. Water coming out of the tap on the left is for bathing and so is untreated. The blue Zimba chlorinator is hooked up to the tap on the right, which is used for drinking water. Courtesy of Suprio Das/Zimba hide caption

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Some Greeks Are Finding Opportunity Amid Their Economy's Uncertainty

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A "shared" workspace at the Atlassian office. The company installed heat and motion sensors to track when and how often every desk, room and table was used. Atlassian hide caption

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How A Bigger Lunch Table At Work Can Boost Productivity

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Monique Yusizanna Ouz, 66, is going to have electricity for the first time in her life. Carrie Kahn/NPR hide caption

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She's 66 And Finally Getting Electricity. Bring On The Ice Cream!

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The sun sets as a visitor uses his mobile phone Monday during the opening day of the 2015 Mobile World Congress in Barcelona. Wall Street Journal reporter Ryan Knutson — interviewed from the conference Monday via Skype by NPR's Robert Siegel — says that for some smartphone users, Wi-Fi may be able to replace most of the functionality of a cellphone carrier. Josep Lago/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Wi-Fi Everywhere May Let You Roam Free From Your Mobile Carrier

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Randall Stephenson, chairman and CEO of AT&T, introduces President Obama before the latter's remarks Dec. 3 at the quarterly meeting of the Business Roundtable, a group Stephenson chairs. Stephenson has said that increasing regulation of the broadband industry — as proposed by the president — would have a substantial chilling effect on its investment in infrastructure. Pool/Getty Images hide caption

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Would FCC Plan Harm Telecom Investment? Even Industry Opinion Is Mixed

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David Goldhill (second from left) talks with Dan Hilferty of Independence Blue Cross, Kevin Nazemi of Oscar Insurance and Sam Nussbaum of WellPoint in a conversation about health costs. Moderator Avik Roy is at far left. Glen Davis/Forbes hide caption

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Students taking part in Columbia University's Ebola design challenge demonstrated for judges how to use a special chamber for decontaminating small items. Courtesy of Columbia Engineering hide caption

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Solar sponge: The top layer of graphite soaks up the sun's energy in tiny holes. When drops of liquid fill the holes, the water quickly evaporates. (The beaker looks hot, but the water below the sponge is cool as a cucumber.) Courtesy of George Ni/MIT hide caption

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