Workers sort through boxes of goods Friday at a delivery company in Lin'an in east China's Zhejiang province. Singles Day on Nov. 11 is promoted by e-commerce giant Alibaba as the world's biggest online shopping event. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yahoo CEO Marissa Mayer, seen speaking in San Francisco in November, says both Yahoo and its investors would have to pay taxes if Alibaba shares were given to investors. Justin Sullivan/Getty Images hide caption

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Chinese Shoppers Set Record For 'Singles Day' Shopping Spree

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Yahoo co-founder Jerry Yang at the 2008 Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas. Yahoo will gain nearly $8 billion from the Alibaba IPO because of its $1 billion investment in Alibaba 2005. Paul Sakuma/AP hide caption

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Paul Sakuma/AP

With Alibaba IPO, Yahoo Reaps A Big Reward From Risky Bet

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Alibaba founder and CEO Jack Ma has much to laugh about. Shares in the company opened Friday at $92.70 on the New York Stock Exchange. The company is now valued at more than $200 billion — that's bigger that Amazon and Facebook. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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Mark Lennihan/AP

Handsome Zhang — that's his real name in Mandarin --€“ runs a shipping company, one of many supporting businesses spawned by East Wind village's furniture industry. The shipping business helped Zhang, 25, buy this Kia sports car. Frank Langfitt/NPR hide caption

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Frank Langfitt/NPR

The Alibaba Effect: How China's eBay Transformed Village Economics

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Jack Ma speaks in Hangzhou, China, on May 10, 2013. Ma shot to fame as the founder of Alibaba, the pioneering Chinese e-commerce site that's poised to be one of the biggest tech IPOs ever when it goes public in New York. Peter Parks/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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From A Chinese Apartment To Wall Street Darling: The Rise Of Alibaba

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Alibaba Group chairman Jack Ma delivers a speech during the Softbank World 2014 annual forum in Tokyo in July. Alibaba is preparing for a multi-billion-dollar stock offer on the New York Stock Exchange. Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Yoshikazu Tsuno/AFP/Getty Images