Sam Rowe for NPR

Drugs That Work In Mice Often Fail When Tried In People

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Gilead Sciences Inc. makes the two leading drugs that can quickly cure hepatitis C infections. But most patients can't afford the expensive drugs, and states restrict their use among Medicaid patients. David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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David Paul Morris/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Should The U.S. Government Buy A Drug Company To Save Money?

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Rep. Lloyd Doggett, D-Texas, is promoting a campaign to get the National Institutes of Health to exercise the patent rights it already owns in regards to certain drugs to bring down their price. Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc. hide caption

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Bill Clark/CQ-Roll Call, Inc.

One Way To Force Down Drug Prices: Have The U.S. Exercise Its Patent Rights

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Medicare accounts for about 29 percent of all spending on prescription medicines in the U.S. each year. stevecoleimages/iStockphoto/Getty Images hide caption

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stevecoleimages/iStockphoto/Getty Images

Medicare Should Leverage Buying Power To Pull Down Drug Prices, White House Says

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The skin of the golden poison dart frog, Phyllobates terribilis, secretes a deadly poison that might lead to a better understanding of how to treat malfunctions of the human nervous system. Tambako the Jaguar/Getty Images hide caption

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Tambako the Jaguar/Getty Images

Chemists Re-Create Deadly Frog Poison In The Lab

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U.S. funding for medical research by source, 1994-2012. (Data were adjusted to 2012 dollars using the Biomedical Research and Development Price Index.) American Medical Association hide caption

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American Medical Association

This experimental Ebola vaccine, developed by the U.S. government, is just one of several undergoing small-scale, preliminary testing. University of Maryland School of Medicine/AP hide caption

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University of Maryland School of Medicine/AP

Ebola Vaccine Could Start Testing In Africa By January

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Dr. Bruce Ribner, medical director of Emory University Hospital's infectious disease unit, embraces Dr. Kent Brantly (left) who was treated with an experimental Ebola medicine and released from the Atlanta hospital Thursday. John Bazemore/AP hide caption

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John Bazemore/AP