Bryan Bashin, CEO of the LightHouse for the Blind and Visually Impaired, in San Francisco, started losing his sight in his teens. "Don't just hide," he advises others. "This is not some kind of deep loss. This is just another side of being human." Jeremy Raff/KQED hide caption

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When A Stranger Leaves You $125 Million
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In the study, muscle cells were injected into the cell-free "scaffolding" of a rat limb, which provided shape and structure onto which regenerated tissue could grow. Bernhard Jank, MD/Ott Laboratory, Massachusetts General Hospital Center for Regenerative Medicine hide caption

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In Massachusetts Lab, Scientists Grow An Artificial Rat Limb
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Lively is a sensor that can be attached to a pill box, keys or doors. It lets people know whether aging parents are taking their medicines or sticking to their routines. Courtesy of Lively hide caption

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Will This Tech Tool Help Manage Older People's Health? Ask Dad
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Doctors used a rapid DNA test to identify a Wisconsin teen's unusual infection with Leptospira bacteria (yellow), which are common in the tropics. CDC/Rob Weyant hide caption

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Quick DNA Tests Crack Medical Mysteries Otherwise Missed
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The Liftware device, shown here as an early prototype (left) and the final design, starts up automatically when it's lifted from the table. There's no "on" switch to fumble with. Ina Jaffe/NPR hide caption

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A Spoon That Shakes To Counteract Hand Tremors
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