Czar Nicholas II is shown with his family in the 1910s. All were executed shortly after the 1917 Russian Revolution. Remains of the czar, his wife, Alexandra (top right) and their children — Olga (from left), Maria, Anastasia, Alexei and Tatiana — have all been identified. Now the Russian Orthodox Church has ordered new DNA tests to confirm the identities of Maria and Alexei. Fine Art Images/Heritage Images/Getty Images hide caption

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Will DNA Tests Finally Settle Controversy Surrounding Russia's Last Czars?
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Anna Matveevna came to this communal apartment in St. Petersburg in 1931, when she was 8 years old. Courtesy of European University, St. Petersburg, Russia,Colgate University and Cornell University hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of European University, St. Petersburg, Russia,Colgate University and Cornell University
How Russia's Shared Kitchens Helped Shape Soviet Politics
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