Cash machines in a supermarket in Kiev weren't working on Wednesday after a cyberattack paralyzed computers in Ukraine and elsewhere. Victims included government offices, energy companies, banks and gas stations. Efrem Lukatsky/AP hide caption

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Efrem Lukatsky/AP

In this photo dated Aug. 23, 2010, Iranian technicians work at the Bushehr nuclear power plant, where Iran had confirmed several personal laptops infected by Stuxnet malware. Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency hide caption

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Ebrahim Norouzi/AP/International Iran Photo Agency

Microsoft President Brad Smith speaks at the annual Microsoft shareholders meeting on Nov. 30, 2016, in Bellevue, Wash. Elaine Thompson/AP hide caption

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Elaine Thompson/AP

Microsoft President Urges Nuclear-Like Limits On Cyberweapons

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After the WannaCry cyberattack hit computer systems worldwide, Microsoft says governments should report software vulnerabilities instead of collecting them. Here, a ransom window announces the encryption of data on a transit display in eastern Germany on Friday. AFP/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Ransomware: When Hackers Lock Your Files, To Pay Or Not To Pay?

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