Kate Teague, a registered nurse at Lucile Packard Children's Hospital, in Palo Alto, Calif., holds a premature baby's hand. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

In Caring For Sickest Babies, Doctors Now Tap Parents For Tough Calls

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Omar looks through Kai's photo book. The charges for the infant's six months of care in the neonatal intensive care unit totaled about $11 million, according to the family, though their insurer very likely negotiated a lower rate. Heidi de Marco/KHN hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/KHN

An Ill Newborn, A Loving Family And A Litany Of Wrenching Choices

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In this Sept. 11 photo provided by Emily Morgan, Chase Morgan holds his son Haiden's hand at the Miami Children's Hospital. Emily Morgan, who unexpectedly gave birth on a cruise ship months before her due date, says she wrapped towels around her boy and, with the help of medical staff, managed to keep him alive until the ship reached port. Emily Morgan/AP hide caption

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Emily Morgan/AP

Researcher John Clements in the early 1980s, after he figured out that lungs need surfactants to breathe. David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF hide caption

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David Powers/Courtesy of UCSF

How A Scientist's Slick Discovery Helped Save Preemies' Lives

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