Apple CEO Tim Cook introduces the latest version of the iPhone on Monday in Cupertino, Calif. The company's legal fight with the FBI may be at an end, or at least a detente, if a third party's suggestion lets the agency hack into the San Bernardino shooters' encrypted iPhone. Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP hide caption

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Marcio Jose Sanchez/AP

Seats are reserved for Apple and FBI at a House Judiciary Committee hearing this month. Apple and the government are fighting over whether the company needs to make it possible for investigators to read data on the encrypted iPhone used by San Bernardino shooter Syed Rizwan Farook. Drew Angerer/Getty Images hide caption

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The FBI wants to access data on a password-protected phone used by one of the San Bernardino shooters. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images

Worcester Polytechnic Institute professor Susan Landau is sworn in alongside Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell (left) and New York County District Attorney Cyrus Vance at a congressional hearing on encryption on March 1. Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images hide caption

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Samuel Corum/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images

Why Digital Security Is An 'Arms Race' Between Firms And The Feds

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Apple General Counsel Bruce Sewell (left) listens to FBI Director James Comey testify before the House Judiciary Committee on Tuesday. Jose Luis Magana/AP hide caption

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Jose Luis Magana/AP

New York police officers stand outside an Apple Store on Tuesday while monitoring a pro-encryption demonstration. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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Julie Jacobson/AP

In Fighting FBI, Apple Says Free Speech Rights Mean No Forced Coding

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Director of the National Intelligence James Clapper, seated at the table meets with the Senate Intelligence Committee Feb. 9, including Chairman Richard Burr, R-N.C. Burr and the committee's minority leader, Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are working on a bill that would force companies like Apple to help prosecutors unlock the phones of criminal suspects. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Alex Brandon/AP

In Apple-FBI Fight, Congress Considers Aggressive And Measured Approaches

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Apple CEO Tim Cook says creating new software to break into a locked iPhone would be "bad news" and "we would never write it." He spoke with ABC News' World News Tonight with David Muir. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Apple CEO Tim Cook: Backdoor To iPhones Would Be Software Equivalent Of Cancer

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The Apple logo is illuminated in the entrance to the Fifth Avenue Apple store in New York City. The company has until Feb. 26 to respond to the Justice Department's motion and an earlier court order. Mark Lennihan/AP hide caption

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A U.S. magistrate judge has ordered Apple to help the FBI break into an iPhone used by one of the two shooters in the San Bernardino attack in December. iStockphoto hide caption

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Can A 1789 Law Apply To An iPhone?

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FBI Director James Comey has said enhanced security on cellphones and other devices blunts the bureau's ability to find terrorists before they strike or to prosecute them if they are caught. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Marc Rotenberg, head of the Electronic Privacy Information Center, opposes phones that would have a built-in backdoor. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

A Privacy Advocate's View Of Ordering Apple To Help Unlock Shooter's iPhone

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FBI Director James Comey is one of the federal officials who has said that the growing use of encryption hurts the ability to track criminals. Keith Srakocic/AP hide caption

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Keith Srakocic/AP

CIA Director John Brennan made this case against encryption on Monday at the Center for Strategic and International Studies in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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After Paris Attacks, Encrypted Communication Is Back In Spotlight

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How Well Do Tech Companies Protect Your Data From Snooping?

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