An Iraqi man prays in 2015 for his slain relative, at the site of a mass grave, believed to contain the bodies of Iraqi soldiers killed by Islamic State group militants when they overran Camp Speicher military base, in Tikrit, Iraq. Khalid Mohammed/AP hide caption

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People react after an explosion in Gaziantep, southeastern Turkey. Gaziantep province Gov. Ali Yerlikaya said the deadly blast, during a wedding near the border with Syria, was a terror attack. Eyyup Burun/AP hide caption

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Turkish Officials Say At Least 54 Killed, Scores Injured In Wedding Bombing

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Sheikh Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktoum, prime minister of United Arab Emirates, wears traditional dress as he listens to an Emirati employee while visiting al-Maktoum International Airport in Dubai. Kamran Jebreili/AP hide caption

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Bullet impacts are pictured at Istanbul's Ataturk airport on Wednesday, a day after a suicide bombing and gun attack killed more than 40 people. Ozan Kose/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Law enforcement officials block off the road near Pulse nightclub on June 15 as they continue the investigation into the shooting there. The Justice Department on Monday released a transcript of a 911 call that Omar Mateen made the night of the shooting. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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U.S. Navy air wing captains pause on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt last September. Every day, the steam-powered catapult aboard this massive ship flings American fighter jets into the sky, on missions to target the extremist Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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A Tunisian woman waves her national flag as international activists gather for the World Social Forum in Tunis on March 25, 2015. Fadel Senna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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The face of a statue lies on the ground at the destroyed museum in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra on March 31. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In The Ruins Of Palmyra, How Many Antiquities Remain?

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Playwright Ismaël Saïdi speaks to a mostly-Muslim students at a school in the Brussels district of Laeken, where two suicide-bombers grew up. Teri Schultz for NPR hide caption

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In Tough Brussels District, School Urges Students To Fight Intolerance

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A general view shows the remains of the entrance to the iconic Temple of Bel this week after Syrian government troops recaptured the UNESCO world heritage site from ISIS militants. Maher Al Mounes/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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An Assyrian Christian woman prays at a church service in Tell Tamer, Syria. The service is to remember members of the community killed after about 300 people were taken captive by ISIS in March 2015. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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In Syria, Assyrian Christians Cling On After ISIS Onslaught

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