The recent spate of attacks — seven since June in North Carolina alone — has little to do with the shark population off American coastlines. Shark attack, George Burgess says, "is driven by the number of humans in the water more than the number of sharks." Carol Buchanan/iStockphoto hide caption

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Carol Buchanan/iStockphoto

Don't Blame The Sharks For 'Perfect Storm' Of Attacks In North Carolina

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The antenna trailing off the diver's foot is there to ward off sharks by creating an electromagnetic field that sharks are sensitive to. Unlike fish snagged with the diver's spear gun, sharks warded off by the Shark Shield remain unharmed. Courtesy of Shark Shield hide caption

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Courtesy of Shark Shield

These Waves Keep Sharks Away From Swimmers

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Robert Shaw (from left), Roy Scheider and Richard Dreyfuss play a shark hunter, a police chief and a marine biologist in 1975's Jaws. Universal/Kobal Collection hide caption

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Universal/Kobal Collection

Richard Dreyfuss' Kids Revisit 'Jaws,' Conclude It Makes No Sense

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