This is one of several canals that will be filled to slow the movement of water through the Everglades, restoring an ecosystem environmentalist Marjory Stoneman Douglas called the "river of grass."€ Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

toggle caption Greg Allen/NPR

Once Parched, Florida's Everglades Finds Its Flow Again

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/466582238/467318903" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

Rowan Jacobsen, in the canoe, and Pete McBride and Sam Walton, on stand-up paddleboards, travel through the upper limitrophe of the delta reach (the section marking the U.S.-Mexico border). Before the dam release, Jacobsen described this parched riverbed as a scene of "Mad Max misery." The temporary flow of water helped bolster native habitats that survive here. Courtesy Fred Phillips hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy Fred Phillips

Well, I'll Be Un-Dammed: Colorado River (Briefly) Reached The Sea

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/330727725/330967240" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript

The decline of honeybees has been attributed to a variety of causes, from nasty parasites to the stress of being transported from state to state to feed on various crops in need of pollination. iStockphoto hide caption

toggle caption iStockphoto

Biologist Says Promoting Diversity Is Key To 'Keeping The Bees'

  • Download
  • <iframe src="https://www.npr.org/player/embed/329994522/330171315" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">
  • Transcript