Demonstrators march through the streets of Winston-Salem, N.C., in July 2015, after the beginning of a federal voting rights trial challenging a 2013 state law. The most controversial part of that law — requiring voters to show photo identification at the polls — goes into effect this week, although its language was softened slightly last summer. Chuck Burton/AP hide caption

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New Year, New Laws: States Diverge On Gun Rights, Voting Restrictions

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California Gov. Jerry Brown signed into law the state's "motor voter" law in hopes of boosting turnout in future elections. The state had 42 percent turnout in the 2014 midterms, a record low. Ringo H.W. Chiu/AP hide caption

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California Becomes 2nd State To Automatically Register Voters

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Oregon Gov. Kate Brown smiles after signing an automatic voter registration bill on Monday in Salem, Ore. Seventeen years after Oregon decided to become the first state in the nation to hold all elections by mail ballot, it is taking another pioneering step to encourage more people to cast ballots, by automatically registering them to vote. Don Ryan/AP hide caption

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Voters crowd into their polling place Aug. 15 at Keonepoko Elementary School in Pahoa, Hawaii. Marco Garcia/AP hide caption

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On The Fall Docket: Who Gets To Vote — And Who Gets To Decide?

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