Syrians gather at the site of multiple bombings in the northern coastal city of Jableh, between Latakia and Tartus, on Monday. Scores of people were killed in a spate of bombings in two regime bastions along Syria's coast. A total of seven blasts simultaneously, four in Jableh and three in Tartus, hit the two cities on Monday morning. Stringer/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Three Somali-American men accused of plotting to join the Islamic State are on trial in Minneapolis. Fadumo Hussein (left) is the stepsister who reared one of the defendants, Guled Omar. She calls him her son and says, "we are not terrorists." Sadik Warfa (right) is a community leader in Minneapolis. Dina Temple-Raston/NPR hide caption

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A video produced by Exit-Deutschland describes the work it does to de-radicalize neo-Nazis. Hayat Germany is trying to use similar techniques to help Germans who may be radicalized by groups like the Islamic State. ExitDeutschlandVideo via YouTube/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Methods For Reforming Neo-Nazis Help Fight The Radicalization Of Muslims
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The picturesque town of Odense — the birthplace of Hans Christian Andersen — is one of the Danish cities battling ISIS and its recruitment efforts. Denmark has one of the worst radicalization problems in Europe. Joao Alves/Flickr hide caption

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To Stop Kids From Radicalizing, Moms In Denmark Call Other Moms
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U.S. Navy air wing captains pause on the flight deck of the aircraft carrier USS Theodore Roosevelt last September. Every day, the steam-powered catapult aboard this massive ship flings American fighter jets into the sky, on missions to target the extremist Islamic State group in Iraq and Syria. Marko Drobnjakovic/AP hide caption

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Al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden speaks to a selected group of reporters in the mountains of Helmand province in southern Afghanistan in 1998. It has been five years since he was killed in a U.S. raid in Pakistan. Rahimullah Yousafzai/AP hide caption

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Ahmed Darwish appears in a police station in Rumeilan, northern Syria, after being captured by Kurdish fighters as he was running away from a battle. He was wounded in a coalition airstrike in support of anti-ISIS forces. "There was camaraderie, friendship, like a brotherhood between us," he says of his time in ISIS. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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Joining ISIS: It's Not Always For Reasons You Might Assume
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U.S. Secretary of Defense Ashton Carter, shown here at the Pentagon in March, has said the "new breed of warrior" — cyberwarriors — will be expected to fight just as hard as their colleagues on conventional battlefields. Saul Loeb/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Rules For Cyberwarfare Still Unclear, Even As U.S. Engages In It
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A replica of Palmyra's 2,000-year-old Arch of Triumph is constructed in London's Trafalgar Square on Monday. The arch, a replica of a monument demolished by ISIS, was made using 3-D imaging produced from photographs. Dan Kitwood/Getty Images hide caption

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A Tunisian woman waves her national flag as international activists gather for the World Social Forum in Tunis on March 25, 2015. Fadel Senna/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tunisian Olfa Hamrouni points at pictures of her daughters Rahma (above) and Ghofran. The teenage girls were exploited by extremist recruits and left their homeland to join ISIS in neighboring Libya. Leila Fadel/NPR hide caption

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She's Lost 2 Daughters To ISIS; Will Her Younger Girls Be Next?
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The face of a statue lies on the ground at the destroyed museum in the ancient Syrian city of Palmyra on March 31. Joseph Eid/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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In The Ruins Of Palmyra, How Many Antiquities Remain?
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An Assyrian Christian woman prays at a church service in Tell Tamer, Syria. The service is to remember members of the community killed after about 300 people were taken captive by ISIS in March 2015. Alice Fordham/NPR hide caption

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In Syria, Assyrian Christians Cling On After ISIS Onslaught
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Defense Secretary Ash Carter (left) and Joint Chiefs Chairman Gen. Joseph Dunford, speak at the Pentagon on Friday. They announced that U.S. forces killed a senior Islamic State leader in an airstrike. Manuel Balce Ceneta/AP hide caption

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Manaf Ibrahim takes a break from making sandwiches in a small town close to an airstrip he believes the U.S. is using to supply its advisers on the ground in eastern Syria. Alice Fordham /NPR hide caption

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A Remote Syrian Airstrip Hints At A Growing American Military Role
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A Libyan fireman stands in front of a flaming oil storage tank in northern Libya's Ras Lanouf region on Jan. 23. It was set alight in fighting with the Islamic State, which has established a strong presence in the country and taken control of the city of Sirte. AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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President Obama answers questions during a joint news conference with Argentine President Mauricio Macri at the Casa Rosada Presidential Palace in Buenos Aires on Wednesday. Victor R. Caivano/AP hide caption

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President Obama Explains His ISIS Strategy
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