National Public Radio host, Michel Martin asks a question at the live performance of Martin's show, Going There at Colorado State University Tuesday May 24, 2016. The show was titled, " The Future of Water." V. Richard Haro/Richard Haro Photography hide caption

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A Conversation About The Future Of Water

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A bathtub ring marks the high-water line on Nevada's Lake Mead, which is on the Colorado River, in 2013. Julie Jacobson/AP hide caption

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How A Historical Blunder Helped Create The Water Crisis In The West

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

What If The Drought Doesn't End? 'The Water Knife' Is One Possibility

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Rowan Jacobsen, in the canoe, and Pete McBride and Sam Walton, on stand-up paddleboards, travel through the upper limitrophe of the delta reach (the section marking the U.S.-Mexico border). Before the dam release, Jacobsen described this parched riverbed as a scene of "Mad Max misery." The temporary flow of water helped bolster native habitats that survive here. Courtesy Fred Phillips hide caption

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Well, I'll Be Un-Dammed: Colorado River (Briefly) Reached The Sea

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