Putting experimental drugs to the test can be a way of life. Glow Wellness/Glow RM/Getty Images hide caption

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Professional 'Guinea Pigs' Can Make A Living Testing Drugs

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A Fix For Gender-Bias In Animal Research Could Help Humans

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Trouble Swallowing Pills?

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When people see charts like this, they think the drug is more effective than if they just read about the data, a study finds. Source: Cornell University hide caption

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Ordinary spoons vary widely in size and shape. Confusing regular spoons for accurate measurements of teaspoons and tablespoons can lead to accidental overdoses. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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