The Angolan military administers yellow fever vaccines at a market in Luanda, the capital city. Joost De Raeymaeker/EPA/Corbis hide caption

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A 'Forgotten Disease' Is Suddenly Causing New Worries

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An Angolan Muslim walks near the ruins of a mosque in Viana, a suburb of Luanda, the Angolan capital. Community members claim that the edifice was destroyed by bulldozers in 2013 after police surrounded the mosque, arguing it did not have the proper documentation. Estelle Maussion /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Angela Helena Carvalho de Sa helps young people succeed on land (as a tutor and mentor) and on the sea (by supporting a skimboarding program that keeps kids out of trouble). Justin T. Gellerson for NPR hide caption

toggle caption Justin T. Gellerson for NPR

Nicaragua's Contra rebels in 1990. The U.S. backed the Contras in the 1980s, which led to the ouster of the leftist Sandinista leadership. But the U.S. aid violated American law and contributed to the biggest scandal of President Reagan's administration. Michael Stravato/AP hide caption

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Photos of Luanda, Angola, tell a tale of two cities: sprawling poor neighborhoods and a glitzy waterfront. Saul Loeb/Getty Images; Michael Gottschalk/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Saul Loeb/Getty Images; Michael Gottschalk/Getty Images