Pesticides called "neonics" are popular among farmers, but also have been blamed for killing bees. In Canada, the province of Ontario is trying to crack down on neonics, with mixed results. James Capaldi/Flickr hide caption

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James Capaldi/Flickr

Cut Down On Bee-Killing Pesticides? Ontario Finds It's Easier Said Than Done

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Minnesota's governor has ordered new restrictions on the use of neonicotinoid pesticides, which have been blamed for killing bees. Many details of the plan, however, remain to be worked out Jim, the Photographer/Flickr hide caption

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Jim, the Photographer/Flickr

A crop duster sprays a field with pesticides. Former USDA scientist Jonathan Lundgren says that he has been persecuted by the agency because his research points out problems with popular pesticides. iStockphoto hide caption

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Peponapis pruinosa is a species of bee in the tribe Eucerini, the long-horned bees. This bee relies on wild and cultivated squashes, pumpkins, gourds and related plants. Wikimedia/USDA hide caption

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Wikimedia/USDA

The White House announced an action plan Tuesday aimed at reversing dramatic declines in pollinators like honeybees, which play a vital role in agriculture, pollinating everything from apples and almonds to squash. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Pollinator Politics: Environmentalists Criticize Obama Plan To Save Bees

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A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower. Albin Andersson/Nature hide caption

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Albin Andersson/Nature

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

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The U.S. Geological Survey found that neonicotinoids are leaching into streams and rivers in the Midwest, including the Missouri River, shown here in Leavenworth, Kan. Dean Bergmann/iStockphoto hide caption

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Dean Bergmann/iStockphoto