Fish and Wildlife Director Dan Ashe (left) and Secretary of the Interior Sally Jewell select confiscated illegal ivory to crush in an effort to halt elephant poaching and ivory trafficking in New York City's Times Square in June 2015. Bebeto Matthews/AP hide caption

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A Kenya Wildlife Services ranger stands guard in front illegal stockpiles of burning elephant tusks at the Nairobi National Park on April 30, 2016. Carl De Souza/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Up In Flames: Kenya Burns More Than 100 Tons Of Ivory

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Baby elephants are a welcome sight in Zakouma National Park in Chad. Thanks to stepped-up enforcement, the park hasn't lost an elephant to poachers since 2012. Without the stress of poaching, the elephants started breeding again and more than 40 calves have been born. Brent Stirton/Reportage by Getty Images for National Geographic Magazine hide caption

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GPS Trackers In Fake Elephant Tusks Reveal Ivory Smuggling Route

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A Maasai boy and his dog, near the skeleton of an elephant killed by poachers outside of Arusha, Tanzania, in 2013. Jason Straziuso/AP hide caption

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DNA Tracking Of Ivory Helps Biologists Find Poaching Hotspots

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Louis E. Pratt, master ivory cutter for Pratt, Read & Co., shows off eight ivory tusks, April 1, 1955. Courtesy of Deep River Historical Society hide caption

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Elephant Slaughter, African Slavery And America's Pianos

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