Starsky Robotics is retrofitting large trucks to make them driverless. The startup hopes that by the end of the year, it will be able to operate a truck without a person physically sitting in the vehicle. Courtesy of Starsky Robotics hide caption

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Courtesy of Starsky Robotics

Starbucks Chairman and CEO Howard Schultz says the company plans to hire 10,000 refugees over the next five years, in response to President Trump's executive order on immigration. Schultz says it "effectively [bans] people from several predominantly Muslim countries from entering the United States, including refugees fleeing wars." Richard Drew/AP hide caption

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Richard Drew/AP

A study by researchers at MIT and the University of Washington found that black men in Boston were twice as likely to have their rides cancelled by Uber drivers. LeoPatrizi/Getty Images hide caption

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LeoPatrizi/Getty Images

Juno CEO Talmon Marco talks with driver Fara Louis Jeune. The company recruited drivers by looking at Uber cars with the highest ratings. Juno hide caption

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Juno

Uber Competitor In NYC Promises Drivers Benefits, Even Employee Status

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A Lyft van sits outside the Austin Convention Center in March, during the 2016 SXSW Festival. The ride-hailing company, along with its competitor Uber, has now vowed to "pause" operations in the city, after Austin voters sided against the ride-hailing apps in a dispute over regulations. Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW

Uber driver Karim Amrani sits in his car parked near the San Francisco International Airport in July. Jeff Chiu/AP hide caption

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Jeff Chiu/AP

Business Travelers Often Skip The Rental Car, Use Uber Instead

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A car with Uber and Lyft stickers at Los Angeles International Airport. Uber dominates the fast-growing ride-hailing business. But Lyft is waging a spirited battle to keep up. Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images hide caption

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Al Seib/LA Times via Getty Images

In The Battle Between Lyft And Uber, The Focus Is On Drivers

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A Lyft "glowstache" rests on a dashboard of a car at the company's San Francisco headquarters. Noah Berger/AP hide caption

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Noah Berger/AP

Lyft, GM Teaming Up To Create Fleet Of Driverless Cars

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Lyft driver Danielle Kerley showcases the company's iconic mustache, which is displayed on cars used in the service. Aarti Shahani/NPR hide caption

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Aarti Shahani/NPR

Some Call For More Sharing In Ridesharing

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