Scientists say bumblebees can sense flowers' electric fields through the bees' fuzzy hairs. Jens Meyer/AP hide caption

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Bumblebees' Little Hairs Can Sense Flowers' Electric Fields

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On Feb. 1, Phanice Cherop works at the AAA Growers' farm in Nyahururu, four hours' drive north of the capital Nairobi, in Kenya. Last year Kenya exported more than 6.8 million cut flowers to the United States. Ilya Gridneff/AP hide caption

toggle caption Ilya Gridneff/AP

PHOTOS: Where Your Roses (Maybe) Came From

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Ready, set, fly! The ball bearings glued to this bumblebee's legs simulate the weight and placement of pollen loads. The tag on the insect's back is a lightweight sensor, designed to track its movements in flight. Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle hide caption

toggle caption Courtesy of Andrew Mountcastle

Heavy Loads Of Pollen May Shift Flight Plans Of The Bumblebee

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