Wencke Petersen, a Doctors Without Borders health worker, talks to a man through a chain link gate in September, when she was doing patient assessment at the front gate of an Ebola treatment unit. "There were days we couldn't take any patients at all," she tells NPR. Michel du Cille/The Washington Post hide caption

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Ebola Gatekeeper: 'When The Tears Stop, You Continue The Work'
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Decontee Davis, 23, initially thought she had malaria when she came down with a fever. It took her more than a week after she got sick to seek treatment for Ebola. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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In Her Own Words: Decontee Davis Remembers Arriving At The Hospital
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Ebola survivor Salome Karwah holds a 10-month-old baby whose parents are being treated for Ebola inside the MSF Ebola Treatment center ELWA 3 in Monrovia, Liberia. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Producer's Notebook: Coming Home From Monrovia To Confusion And Fear
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NPR's Jason Beaubien (center, in sunglasses) talks with Liberians looking for work at the construction site for a 25-bed hospital in Monrovia. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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The home of Marthalene Williams, the Ebola-stricken woman aided by Thomas Eric Duncan. A man on the porch, who appeared to be in the late stages of Ebola, informed our photographer that he'd been to a hospital but was told to return home and quarantine himself. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

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Fond Memories Of Ebola Victim Eric Duncan, Anger Over His Death
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Liberian physician Martha Zarway continues work in a temporary clinic while her original facility is disinfected. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Martha Zarway Of Monrovia: 'I'm A Doctor, So We Can't Run Away'
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Eva Nah raised her nephew Shacki from the age of 2, when he lost his parents. "Every day [when] I wake up I cry because I feel bad that Shacki has left me," she says. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Remembering Shacki: Liberia's Accidental Ebola Victim
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Information minister Lewis Brown is proud of Liberia's strong response to Ebola but admits, "We think sometimes we could have done better — much quicker — to improve the response time." Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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A team of body collectors carry the corpse of a woman suspected of dying of Ebola in Monrovia, Liberia's capital. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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They Are The Body Collectors: A Perilous Job In The Time Of Ebola
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Why Patients Aren't Coming To Liberia's Redemption Hospital
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After arriving by ambulance, people with suspected Ebola virus lie on the ground before being admitted to the Doctors Without Borders Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, Liberia, last week. The 120 beds in the center were filled almost immediately. John Moore/Getty Images hide caption

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Aid Workers In Short Supply As Ebola Grips Liberia
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The beach is a perfect playing field for soccer lovers in West Point. Tommy Trenchard for NPR hide caption

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Life Goes On, Even With The Specter Of Ebola
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Saah Exco was found alone on a beach, naked and abandoned a few days ago. Neighbors were afraid to touch him; they were worried about Ebola. But someone did eventually take him to the Ebola ward at JFK hospital in Monrovia. NPR learned today that he died. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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The 10-Year-Old Boy Has Died, Probably Of Ebola
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A 10-year-old boy suspected of being sick with Ebola was found naked on the beach by residents of West Point. They dressed him but couldn't find a clinic to take him in at first. Eventually he was was taken to JFK Hospital in Monrovia. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Reporting On Ebola: An Abandoned 10-Year-Old, A Nervous Neighborhood
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NPR's Ebola coverage team brought a lot of cleaning equipment — not because they planned to go into risky places but because you can never be too careful. The boots are very handy and can be washed with chlorine. Wearing surgical gloves reminds our correspondent not to touch her face. Ryan Kellman/NPR hide caption

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A man sits on a bed that will be part a new Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, run by Doctors Without Borders. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

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Hit Hard By Ebola, Liberia Now Has A Third Treatment Center
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Radio, TV and newspapers aren't the only media used in Liberia to keep the public informed about Ebola. In the capital city of Monrovia, a chalkboard features the latest news about the virus. Ahmed Jallanzo/EPA /LANDOV hide caption

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