Under the old rules, the CDC's authority was primarily limited to detaining travelers entering the U.S. or crossing state lines. With the new rules, the CDC would be able to detain people anywhere in the country, without getting approval from state and local officials. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Wilson/Getty Images

CDC Seeks Controversial New Quarantine Powers To Stop Outbreaks

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In 1962, a local leader in the Eastern Highlands of Papua New Guinea asks Fore men to stop the sorcery that he believes is killing women and children. Courtesy Shirley Lindenbaum hide caption

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Courtesy Shirley Lindenbaum

Mary Mallon, known as "Typhoid Mary," was immune to the typhoid she carried. Working as a cook, she spread the disease in New York and ended up quarantined on Brother Island (above) for more than two decades. Bettmann/Corbis hide caption

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Bettmann/Corbis

Kenyan health officials take the temperatures of passengers arriving at the Nairobi airport on Thursday. Kenya has no reported cases of Ebola, but it's a transportation hub and so is on alert. Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Simon Maina/AFP/Getty Images

A Virtual Outbreak Offers Hints Of Ebola's Future

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