Members of Doctors Without Borders demonstrated in Geneva, after U.S. forces bombed the organization's hospital in the northern Afghanistan city of Kunduz. Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

toggle caption Fabrice Coffrini/AFP/Getty Images

The trauma center operated in Kunduz by Doctors Without Borders was in flames after U.S. airstrikes on Saturday that left 22 dead, including medical staff and patients. AP hide caption

toggle caption AP

A female sanitation worker wears standard gear for a Doctors Without Borders Ebola center. The outfit includes rubber boots, goggles, a face mask, a hood, three layers of gloves, a Tyvek suit and thick rubber apron. No exposed skin is allowed. She was photographed in Monrovia, Liberia. John W. Poole/NPR hide caption

toggle caption John W. Poole/NPR

Goats and Soda

Gear Wars: Whose Ebola Protective Suit Is Better?

Is it OK to expose a glimmer of skin? Is a thicker suit better? Doctors Without Borders and the World Health Organization have different standards.

Listen Loading… 4:40
  • Playlist
  • Download
  • Embed
    <iframe src="" width="100%" height="290" frameborder="0" scrolling="no" title="NPR embedded audio player">

After losing most of his family to Ebola, health worker Alexander Kollie (right) is building a new life with son Kollie James, the 1,000th survivor of the disease to be cared for by Doctors Without Borders. Katy Athersuch/Courtesty of Doctors Without Borders hide caption

toggle caption Katy Athersuch/Courtesty of Doctors Without Borders

A man sits on a bed that will be part a new Ebola treatment center in Monrovia, run by Doctors Without Borders. David Gilkey/NPR hide caption

toggle caption David Gilkey/NPR