Reservoir caretaker Doug Billingsley tests water levels at windswept Chambers Lake near Cameron Pass, Colo. Grace Hood/Colorado Public Radio hide caption

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As Technology Marches On, Reservoir Caretakers Stay At Their Posts
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People paddle past a flooded house as water that breached dams upstream continues to reach the eastern part of the state on October 8, 2015 in Andrews, S.C. Many dams in the state — and across the country — are in need of repair. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Across Washington State, hydroelectric dams are blocking salmon as they migrate to their spawning grounds. Enter the salmon cannon. Ingrid Taylar/Flickr hide caption

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The Salmon Cannon: Easier Than Shooting Fish Out Of A Barrel
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