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Scientists Are Not So Hot At Predicting Which Cancer Studies Will Succeed

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"In college, I would tell my friends that I wanted to pursue a Ph.D., and they would chuckle and ridicule the idea," says Eqbal Dauqan, who is an assistant professor at the University Kebangsaan Malaysia at age 36. Born and raised in Yemen, Dauqan credits her "naughty" spirit for her success in a male-dominated culture. Sanjit Das for NPR hide caption

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Sanjit Das for NPR

She May Be The Most Unstoppable Scientist In The World

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The theft of agricultural trade secrets is a growing problem, according to the FBI. University of Michigan School of Environment and Sustainability/Flickr hide caption

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University of Michigan School of Environment and Sustainability/Flickr

The new report from leading U.S. scientists shines a spotlight on how the research enterprise as a whole creates incentives that can be detrimental to good research. Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images hide caption

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Robert Essel NYC/Getty Images

Top Scientists Revamp Standards To Foster Integrity In Research

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Scientific Conference Planners Concerned About Immigration Policy

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Carmen Bachmann founded "Chance for Science," a website that connects refugee academics with scientists working in Germany. Thomas Victor for NPR hide caption

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Thomas Victor for NPR

While Others Saw Refugees, This German Professor Saw Human Potential

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Hanan Isweiri is a Ph.D. student at Colorado State University. She flew to Libya in January to visit with family after her father's death. She was able to re-enter the U.S. Saturday. Courtesy of Colorado State University hide caption

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Courtesy of Colorado State University

Travel Ban Keeps Scientists Out Of The Lab

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Biologist Shaun Clements counts down the seconds before emptying a vial of synthetic DNA into a stream near Alsea, Oregon. Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix hide caption

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Jes Burns/Oregon Public Broadcasting/EarthFix

Artist's rendering of two individuals of Siamogale melilutra, one of them feeding on a freshwater clam. Mauricio Antón/Journla of Systematic Palaeontology hide caption

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Mauricio Antón/Journla of Systematic Palaeontology

Research with living systems is never simple, scientists say, so there are many possible sources of variation in any experiment, ranging from the animals and cells to the details of lab technique. Tom Werner/Getty Images hide caption

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Tom Werner/Getty Images

What Does It Mean When Cancer Findings Can't Be Reproduced?

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Researchers found that rats experiencing positive emotions had an increased pinkish hue on their ears, like the animal on the left. The animal on the right is from the control group. Plos One hide caption

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Plos One

In 2004 Reid Brewer of the University of Alaska Southeast measured an unusual beaked whale that turned up dead in Alaska's Aleutian Islands. A tissue sample from the carcass later showed that the whale was one of the newly identified species. Don Graves hide caption

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Don Graves

An artist's concept depicts one possible appearance of the planet Kepler-452b, the first near-Earth-size world to be found in the habitable zone of a star that is similar to our sun. NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle hide caption

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NASA Ames/JPL-Caltech/T. Pyle

Neuroscientist Takashi Kitamura works in the lab of Nobel laureate Susumu Tonegawa at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. One of their recent projects helped identify a brain circuit involved in processing the "where" and "when" of memory. "Ocean cells" (red) and "island cells" (blue) play key roles. Takashi Kitamura/MIT hide caption

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Takashi Kitamura/MIT

30,000 Brain Researchers Meld Minds At Science's Hottest Hangout

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Kroto displays a model of his discovery in 1996: a soccer ball-shape carbon molecule that spawned a new field of study and could act as a tiny cage to transport other chemicals. Michael Scates/AP hide caption

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Michael Scates/AP

A Discoverer Of The Buckyball Offers Tips On Winning A Nobel Prize

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An attempt to build the perfect cockroach cyborg. Carlos Sanchez, Ph.D. student of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University hide caption

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Carlos Sanchez, Ph.D. student of Mechanical Engineering, Texas A&M University

What Cockroaches With Backpacks Can Do. Ah-mazing

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