sex trafficking sex trafficking

The website Backpage has removed adult advertisements. A Senate report last year accused the website of being a forum for child sex trafficking. Backpage/Screenshot by NPR hide caption

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Backpage/Screenshot by NPR

This photo released by the Texas Office of the Attorney General shows Carl Ferrer, the CEO of Backpage, a classifieds website that allows users to post escort ads. Ferrer was arrested Thursday on felony pimping charges. Texas Office of the Attorney General via AP hide caption

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Texas Office of the Attorney General via AP

Sam Tahour, district manager for Travel Centers of America, stands next to a travel plaza in Oak Grove, Mo. Tahour was trained as part of a new effort to identify and stop sex trafficking at truck stops. Frank Morris/KCUR hide caption

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Frank Morris/KCUR

Truckers Take The Wheel In Effort To Halt Sex Trafficking

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Egypt's justice ministry says it will begin strictly enforcing a law requiring foreign men to pay to marry a woman 25 years younger or more. Human rights groups say the law only bolsters a business that preys on the poor and the vulnerable. George Peters/Getty Images hide caption

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George Peters/Getty Images

Does Egypt's Law Protect 'Short-Term Brides' Or Formalize Trafficking?

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For Sex Industry, Bitcoin Steps In Where Credit Cards Fear To Tread

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The Daulatdia brothel is the largest in Bangladesh, with more 2,000 prostitutes. Many arrived here after being kidnapped by gangs, sold by family members or lured with promises of good jobs. Lisa Wiltse/Corbis hide caption

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Lisa Wiltse/Corbis