Neanderthals Neanderthals

The skull of La Ferrassie Neanderthal, from France. Jacquelyn Martin/AP hide caption

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Jacquelyn Martin/AP

Some Plaque To Build A Theory On: Did Humans And Neanderthals Kiss?

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A new study of the dental plaques of three Neanderthals reveals surprising facts about their lives, including what they ate, the diseases that ailed them and how they self-medicated (and smooched). (Above) An illustration of Neanderthals in Spain shows them preparing to eat plants and mushrooms. Courtesy of Abel Grau/Comunicación CSIC hide caption

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Courtesy of Abel Grau/Comunicación CSIC

Some Neanderthals Were Vegetarian — And They Likely Kissed Our Human Ancestors

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Martin Meissner/AP

Were Neanderthals Religious?

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Researchers found numerous ring-like structures inside France's Bruniquel Cave. They believe they were built by Neanderthals some 176,000 years ago. Etienne FABRE - SSAC hide caption

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Etienne FABRE - SSAC

Mysterious Cave Rings Show Neanderthals Liked To Build

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Researcher Svante Pääbo, was able to extract a complete genome from this ancient human leg bone. Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology hide caption

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Bence Viola/Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology

A 45,000-Year-Old Leg Bone Reveals The Oldest Human Genome Yet

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