Eyesight Eyesight

A partial solar eclipse (left) is seen from the Cotswolds, United Kingdom, while a total solar eclipse is seen from Longyearbyen, Norway, in March 2015. Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Tim Graham/Getty Images/Haakon Mosvold Larsen/AFP/Getty Images

Be Smart: A Partial Eclipse Can Fry Your Naked Eyes

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Proper eye protection is a must for anyone looking up at a solar eclipse. Eclipse glasses are far darker than regular sunglasses. Joseph Okpako/Getty Images hide caption

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Joseph Okpako/Getty Images

Planning To Watch The Eclipse? Here's What You Need To Protect Your Eyes

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In a study that tested the vision of people from a variety of professions, researchers at the University of California, Berkeley found that dressmakers who spend many hours doing fine, manual work seemed to have a superior ability to see in 3-D. Elena Fantini/Getty Images hide caption

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Elena Fantini/Getty Images

A Nuremberg magnifier and wooden case, made in Germany around 1700. Before spectacles become easier to wear and more comfortable, hand-held models were more common than those for the face. Courtesy of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Museum of Vision hide caption

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Courtesy of the American Academy of Ophthalmology Museum of Vision

The number of children who need glasses has risen quickly across East Asia and Southeast Asia. But some parents and doctors in China are skeptical of lenses. They think glasses weaken children's vision. Imaginechina/Corbis hide caption

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Imaginechina/Corbis

Why Is Nearsightedness Skyrocketing Among Chinese Youth?

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Surprise! Not one of these things contains a single speck of blue pigment. Evan Leeson/Bob Peterson/lowjumpingfrog/Look Into My Eyes/Flickr hide caption

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Evan Leeson/Bob Peterson/lowjumpingfrog/Look Into My Eyes/Flickr

How Animals Hacked The Rainbow And Got Stumped On Blue

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