Mark Rosekind, administrator of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, speaks Wednesday during a news conference on Takata air bags in Washington, D.C. Mark Wilson/Getty Images hide caption

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DOT Announces Recall Of Up To 40 Million More Takata Air Bag Inflators

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Hiroshi Shimizu, senior vice president of global quality assurance at Japanese air bag maker Takata, apologizes for the failure of the defective devices on Capitol Hill in Washington on Thursday. J. Scott Applewhite/AP hide caption

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The 2002 Honda CR-V is one of dozens of car models subject to a recall for faulty air bags. The air bag manufacturer, Takata, supplies bags for more than 30 percent of all cars and is one of only three large air bag suppliers. Insurance Institute for Highway Safety/AP hide caption

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No Quick Fixes For Drivers Affected By Air Bag Recall

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