prosthetics prosthetics

Gabriel Zepeda (right) makes an all-terrain wheelchair. He's been making wheelchairs for low-income Mexicans for 27 years. Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR hide caption

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Mónica Ortiz Uribe for NPR

Mexico And U.S. Team Up To Create Low-Cost Wheelchairs

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Robert Gaunt tests Nathan Copeland's ability to detect touch by tapping fingers on a robotic hand. UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences hide caption

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UPMC/Pitt Health Sciences

Brain Implant Restores Sense Of Touch To Paralyzed Man

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Zhenan Bao, a chemical engineer at Stanford University, is working to invent an artificial skin from plastic that can sense, heal and power itself. The thin plastic sheets are made with built-in pressure sensors. Bao Research Group hide caption

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Bao Research Group

Just Like Human Skin, This Plastic Sheet Can Sense And Heal

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Teacher Kim Song Bo lectures at a new school that is training students to make prosthetic limbs. Classes are held at the Center for the Rehabilitation of the Paralyzed in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Amy Yee/NPR hide caption

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Amy Yee/NPR

The Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab created an electronic prosthetic hand and arm that has the same dexterity as a human arm. Electronic prosthetics are the biggest area of growth in this industry. Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab hide caption

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Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Lab

Gary Walters demonstrates his self-cooling prosthetic. Leto Solutions via YouTube hide caption

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Leto Solutions via YouTube

Vet's Self-Cooling Prosthetic Could Help Amputees Beat The Heat

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