Amid much speculation by private security analysts, the FBI stood by its claim this week that North Korea was responsible for the hack against Sony Pictures. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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The Interview is now Sony's top online movie. It earned $15 million through rentals and sales, the studio said. It pulled in almost another $3 million from theater screenings. Jim Ruymen/UPI/Landov hide caption

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The Interview starring James Franco and Seth Rogen opened in 331 mostly independent theaters and on streaming sites Christmas Day. It's estimated to rake in $4 million in its opening weekend. Marcus Ingram/Getty Images hide caption

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The toxic ingredients of a cyberattack like the one North Korea is accused of unleashing on Sony Pictures are available in underground markets. Damian Dovarganes/AP hide caption

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Sony Hack Highlights The Global Underground Market For Malware
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Sony Pictures CEO Michael Lynton says the computer hacking against his company is "the worst cyberattack in U.S. history." Experts say other attacks have affected more people. David McNew/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Is Sony Hack Really 'The Worst' In U.S. History, As CEO Claims?
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