A federal judge on Thursday dismissed allegations by prosecutors that Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, seen here Feb. 11, tried to cover up the alleged involvement of Iranian officials in the 1994 bombing of a Jewish center in Buenos Aires. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Diego Lagomarsino, a computer expert who gave late prosecutor Alberto Nisman the gun that killed him, speaks to reporters during a press conference in Buenos Aires last month. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Minor Characters Take The Stage In Argentina's Real-Life Murder Mystery
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Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner will send letters of clarification to two celebrities, after they tweeted about the controversial death of prosecutor Alberto Nisman. Kirchner is seen here during her current trip to China. Pool/Landov hide caption

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Chinese President Xi Jinping shakes hands with Argentine President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner during their talks in Beijing on Wednesday. In a tweet she sent out today, Kirchner appeared to mock Chinese speech. Pang Xinglei/Xinhua /Landov hide caption

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A woman holds up a portrait of late prosecutor Alberto Nisman near the funeral home where a private wake was held for him in January in Buenos Aires. Rodrigo Abd/AP hide caption

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Argentina's President Cristina Fernandez unveiled her plan to replace her country's intelligence service with a new agency. She delivered a televised speech while seated in a wheelchair in Buenos Aires. Reuters/Landov hide caption

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