Tom Brokaw tells Fresh Air that he has nothing more to say about the Brian Williams controversy. Charles Sykes/Charles Sykes/Invision/AP hide caption

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Excerpt of Tom Brokaw on "Fresh Air"
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Journalist Brian Williams hosts The Lincoln Awards: A Concert For Veterans & The Military Family on Jan. 7 at John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. Recent reports suggest the suspended NBC anchor may have embellished several of his stories. Paul Morigi/Getty Images Entertainment hide caption

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Months After Scandal, Will Brian Williams Return To NBC News?
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Television personality Bill O'Reilly waits for the start of an event at the White House in February 2014. O'Reilly has for the past week fired back angrily at critics who have accused him of inflating his war-reporting record in a manner similar to suspended NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Despite Furious Objections, Bill O'Reilly's War Claims Warrant Scrutiny
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Brian Williams speaks onstage at the New York Comedy Festival in November of 2014. Monica Schipper/Getty Images for New York Comedy Festival hide caption

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NBC's Brian Williams, seen here on Nov. 13, 2014, has apologized for incorrectly saying he was aboard a helicopter in Iraq in 2003 that was hit and forced down by enemy fire. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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NBC News anchor Brian Williams with his daughter, actress Allison Williams, and his wife Jane Williams at HBO's "Girls" fourth season premiere party in New York. Evan Agostini/AP hide caption

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NBC Nightly News anchor Brian Williams admits that his story of being on a helicopter hit by enemy fire in Iraq in 2003 was untrue and has apologized to troops and viewers. Monica Schipper/Getty Images hide caption

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Brian Williams' Self-Inflicted War Wounds
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NBC's Brian Williams, seen here on Nov. 13, 2014, has apologized for incorrectly saying he was aboard a helicopter in Iraq in 2003 that was hit and forced down by enemy fire. Julio Cortez/AP hide caption

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