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Neo-Nazis, white supremacists and other demonstrators encircle counterprotesters at the base of a statue of Thomas Jefferson on the University of Virginia campus in Charlottesville, Va., on Friday. NurPhoto/Getty Images hide caption

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Christina Chung for NPR

When 'Where Are You From?' Takes You Someplace Unexpected

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"Racial impostor syndrome" is definitely a thing for many people. We hear from biracial and multi-ethnic listeners who connect with feeling "fake" or inauthentic in some part of their racial or ethnic heritage. Kristen Uroda for NPR hide caption

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Kristen Uroda for NPR

'Racial Impostor Syndrome': Here Are Your Stories

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President Donald Trump gives the commencement address for the Class of 2017 at Liberty University in Lynchburg, Va., Saturday. Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP hide caption

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Pablo Martinez Monsivais/AP

At Liberty, Trump Calls Critics 'Pathetic,' Praises Putting 'Faith Into Action'

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Daniel Klein picks meat from crabs with the young daughter of a former strawberry picker in Oxnard, Calif., for an episode called "A Day In The Life." Courtesy of Perennial Plate hide caption

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Courtesy of Perennial Plate

Yara Shahidi has to navigate complex racial issues both inside and outside the world of Black-ish. Rich Fury/Getty Images hide caption

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Rich Fury/Getty Images

Listen to this week's podcast episode

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People gather in the Pico-Union neighborhood of Los Angeles during rioting following the acquittal of four police officers in the beating of Rodney King in 1992. The neighborhood looks similar today as it did 25 years ago. It's still more than 80 percent Latino, with lots of immigrant families from Mexico and Central America. Gary Leonard/Corbis via Getty Images hide caption

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Gary Leonard/Corbis via Getty Images

As Los Angeles Burned, The Border Patrol Swooped In

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Christopher Mensah, owner and tattoo artist at the Pinz-N-Needlez tattoo shop in Washington, D.C., creates the outline for Oshun Afrique's 35th tattoo. Raquel Zaldivar/NPR hide caption

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Raquel Zaldivar/NPR

For Tattoo Artists, Race Is In The Mix When Ink Meets Skin

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Tonya Stands recovers from being pepper sprayed by police after swimming across a creek with other protesters hoping to block construction of the Dakota Access Pipeline, near Cannon Ball, N.D., on November 2. John L. Mone/AP hide caption

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John L. Mone/AP