Beyond the fruit-sweetened stuff: Around the world, cooks turn to yogurt for a huge variety of culinary delights. From left: cast-iron chicken marinated in a yogurt-spice blend and topped with the Middle Eastern grain freekeh; a Persian cold yogurt soup; shitake frittata with labneh, kale and shallots. From Yogurt Culture by Cheryl Sternman Rule Ellen Silverman/Courtesy of Houghton Mifflin Harcourt hide caption

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Everything Bagel: This yogurt from Sohha Savory Yogurt comes topped with roasted pine nuts, poppy seeds, sesame seeds, garlic, onion and extra virgin olive oil. Christina Holmes/Courtesy of Sohha Savory Yogurt hide caption

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Sugar Hooked Us On Yogurt. Could Savory Be The New Sweet?

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A depiction of meal with cheese from Tacuinum Sanitatis, a medieval handbook on health and well-being based on the Taqwim al‑sihha, an 11th-century Arab medical treatise. via Wikimedia hide caption

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Cottage cheese peaked in the early 1970s, when the average American ate about 5 pounds of it per year, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture. iStockphoto hide caption

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The Fall Of A Dairy Darling: How Cottage Cheese Got Eclipsed By Yogurt

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Historic yogurt-making cultures held by Mirjana Curic-Bawden. Dan Charles/NPR hide caption

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Hey Yogurt-Maker, Where'd You Get Those Microbes?

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Scientists have documented that beneficial microorganisms play a critical role in how our bodies function. And it's becoming clear that the influence goes beyond the gut — researchers are turning their attention to our emotional health. iStockphoto hide caption

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Prozac In The Yogurt Aisle: Can 'Good' Bacteria Chill Us Out?

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A Crime Of Passion: When The Love Of Yogurt Burned Too Bright

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