fentanyl fentanyl

Andrea Towson used heroin for more than three decades. After a near-death experience with fentanyl, she sought help. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

'That Fentanyl — That's Death': A Story Of Recovery In Baltimore

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A test strip designed to help doctors check a patient's urine for fentanyl is being distributed in the Bronx to encourage users of heroin or other opioids to check what's in their syringe before they inject. Mary Harris/WNYC hide caption

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Mary Harris/WNYC

An Experiment Helps Heroin Users Test Their Street Drugs For Fentanyl

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Lisa, a client at the AAC Needle Exchange and Overdose Prevention Program in Cambridge, Mass. Nearly five years after an opioid overdose she still limps — possibly because of damage the drug cocktail did to her nerves or muscles. Robin Lubbock/WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock/WBUR

What Doesn't Kill You Can Maim: Unexpected Injuries From Opioids

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Allyson and Eddie, clients at the AAC Needle Exchange and Overdose Prevention Program in Cambridge, Mass., say they carry naloxone and try to never use drugs alone to reduce the risk of overdosing. Robin Lubbock for WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock for WBUR

Fentanyl Adds A New Terror For People Abusing Opioids

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Members of the Royal Canadian Mounted Police go through a decontamination procedure after intercepting a package containing around 1 kilogram (2.2 pounds) of the powerful opioid carfentanil, imported from China to Vancouver. China has now added the drug to its list of controlled substances. AP hide caption

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AP

First responders have found that standard doses of naloxone aren't always enough to counteract the powerful sedating effects of carfentanil. Ted Horowitz/Getty Images hide caption

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Ted Horowitz/Getty Images

An Even Deadlier Opioid, Carfentanil, Is Hitting The Streets

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These pills were made to look like Oxycodone, but they're actually an illicit form of the potent painkiller fentanyl. A surge in police seizures of illicit fentanyl parallels a rise in overdose deaths. Tommy Farmer/Tennessee Bureau of Investigation/AP hide caption

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Tommy Farmer/Tennessee Bureau of Investigation/AP

Heroin sold in the U.S., like this dose confiscated in Alabama last fall, is often cut with other drugs. Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov hide caption

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Tamika Moore/AL.com/Landov

Illicit Version Of Painkiller Fentanyl Makes Heroin Deadlier

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