naloxone naloxone

First responders in Washington, D.C., bring naloxone on every emergency call. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

First Responders Spending More On Overdose Reversal Drug

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Andrea Towson used heroin for more than three decades. After a near-death experience with fentanyl, she sought help. Shelby Knowles/NPR hide caption

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Shelby Knowles/NPR

'That Fentanyl — That's Death': A Story Of Recovery In Baltimore

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Some medical professionals say declaring a national emergency could make Naloxone, a drug that treats opioid overdoses, more readily available. Scott Olson/Getty Images hide caption

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Scott Olson/Getty Images

Should The Opioid Crisis Be Declared A National Emergency?

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Medicaid spending on medications used to treat opioid addiction has risen sharply in recent years. Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg/Bloomberg via Getty Images

People in their mid-40s to mid-60s are more likely than any other group to be prescribed opioids with benzodiazepines. Both kinds of drugs can hamper breathing and mixing them is especially risky. Erwin Wodicka/iStock hide caption

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Erwin Wodicka/iStock

In Prince's Age Group, Risk Of Opioid Overdose Climbs

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"The Block is like living," outreach worker Nathan Fields says. "These relationships, you've got to keep them flourishing." Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Meredith Rizzo/NPR

Pitching Health Care In Baltimore's Red Light District

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In Boston, Edmund Hassan, a deputy superintendent of emergency medical services, and his colleagues regularly revive people who have overdosed on opioids. Jesse Costa/WBUR hide caption

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Jesse Costa/WBUR

Reversing Opioid Overdoses Saves Lives But Isn't A Cure-All

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Katie Serio, director of treatment and prevention at the Council on Alcohol and Substance Abuse of Livingston County, N.Y., trains a group of school nurses to use the overdose antidote naloxone at Dansville High School. Michelle Faust/Side Effects Public Media hide caption

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Michelle Faust/Side Effects Public Media

School Nurses Stock Drug To Reverse Opioid Overdoses

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A nasal spray version of the overdose-reversing drug naloxone demonstrated at police headquarters in Quincy, Mass., in 2014. Gretchen Ertl/Reuters/Landov hide caption

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Gretchen Ertl/Reuters/Landov

Price Soars For Key Weapon Against Heroin Overdoses

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Health worker Nathan Fields (left), Rep. Donna Edwards and Dr. Leana Wen show people how to use naloxone on a street corner in Sandtown, a Baltimore neighborhood where drug activity is common. Andrea Hsu/NPR hide caption

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Andrea Hsu/NPR

Baltimore Fights Heroin Overdoses With Antidote Outreach

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