Volkswagen CEO Matthias Mueller speaks to the media Sunday in Detroit, apologizing for the scandal that has plunged the German auto giant into crisis. Paul Sancya/AP hide caption

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Paul Sancya/AP

'We Didn't Lie,' Volkswagen CEO Says Of Emissions Scandal

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John Swanton of the California Air Resources Board, explaining how a 2013 Volkswagen with a diesel engine is evaluated at an emissions test lab. The U.S. has filed a civil complaint against Volkswagen over emissions cheating in its diesel cars. Nick Ut/AP hide caption

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Nick Ut/AP

Volkswagen Chairman Hans Dieter Pötsch (left) and CEO Matthias Müller attend a news conference Thursday in Wolfsburg, Germany, to announce the latest update in the company's handling of its emissions scandal. Carsten Koall/Getty Images hide caption

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The Volkswagen logo is seen at the main entrance gate of the Volkswagen group on Friday in Wolfsburg, Germany. That day, CEO Matthias Mueller announced the company would be cutting expenditures by more than $1 billion. Alexander Koerner/Getty Images hide caption

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A car departs from Volkswagen's factory and company headquarters in Wolfsburg, Germany. The company says the fallout from its diesel emissions scandal is still becoming clear, as it reports a large quarterly loss. Sean Gallup/Getty Images hide caption

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Kim Johnson of Ridgefield, Conn., says her 2014 Jetta lost more than $1,000 in value because, once fixed, it will no longer get the advertised mileage. Charles Lane/WSHU hide caption

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Charles Lane/WSHU

Emissions Scandal Is Hurting VW Owners Trying To Resell

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It's Not Just VW: A Robust Market For Reprogramming Vehicles

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Then-CEO Martin Winterkorn poses at Volkswagen's annual press conference in Wolfsburg, Germany, in 2012. He resigned his post last month following revelations that VW cheated on emissions tests. Michael Sohn/AP hide caption

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Michael Sohn/AP

How VW's Drive To Be No. 1 May Have Put It In Reverse

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Volkswagen Group of America President and CEO Michael Horn testifies before the House Committee on Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations on the Volkswagen emissions cheating scandal Thursday. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Volkswagen board members Wolfgang Porsche (from left), Berthold Huber and Stephan Weil attend a news conference to announce Martin Winterkorn's decision to resign as Volkswagen CEO on Sept. 23, in Wolfsburg, Germany. Alexander Koerner/Getty Images hide caption

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Alexander Koerner/Getty Images

What VW Needs To Do To Survive Its Biggest Scandal

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David Whitcomb of Waynesboro, Va., says he paid a premium for the diesel engine on his 2015 Passat TDI because he thought it would mean fewer emissions. Courtesy of David Whitcomb hide caption

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Courtesy of David Whitcomb

Volkswagen Owners Wonder Where A Fix Will Leave Them

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A Volkswagen Passat is tested for exhaust emissions, at a Ministry of Transport testing station in London. In the U.S., a 1998 copyright law prevents safety researchers from accessing the software that runs cars. John Stillwell/PA Photos/Landov hide caption

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John Stillwell/PA Photos/Landov

Amid VW Scandal, Critics Want Access To Carmakers' Computer Code

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German carmaker Volkswagen says it has a plan to refit diesel cars that will make them comply with emissions standards. Here, the entrance to a VW branch in Duesseldorf, Germany, is seen on Monday. Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Patrik Stollarz/AFP/Getty Images

Matthias Mueller, new chief executive of Volkswagen AG, attends a news conference at the VW factory in in Wolfsburg, Germany, on Friday. Mueller takes over after Martin Winterkorn resigned earlier this week amid a diesel emissions-testing scandal. Julian Stratenschulte/EPA/Landov hide caption

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Julian Stratenschulte/EPA/Landov