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This sequence of images shows the development of embryos formed after eggs were injected with both CRISPR, a gene-editing tool, and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause cardiomyopathy. OHSU hide caption

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OHSU

Exclusive: Inside The Lab Where Scientists Are Editing DNA In Human Embryos

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The first sign of successful in vitro fertilization, after co-injection of a gene-correcting enzyme and sperm from a donor with a genetic mutation known to cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. Courtesy of OHSU hide caption

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Courtesy of OHSU

Scientists Precisely Edit DNA In Human Embryos To Fix A Disease Gene

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Alicia Watkins for NPR

Breaking Taboo, Swedish Scientist Seeks To Edit DNA Of Healthy Human Embryos

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Molecular markers show structures and cell types within a human embryo, shown here 12 days after fertilization. The epiblast, for example, appears in green. Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University hide caption

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Gist Croft, Alessia Deglincerti, and Ali H. Brivanlou/The Rockefeller University

Advance In Human Embryo Research Rekindles Ethical Debate

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Human stem cells, in this case made from adult skin cells, can give rise to any sort of human cell. Some scientists would like to insert such cells into nonhuman, animal embryos, in hopes of one day growing human organs for transplantation. Science Source hide caption

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Science Source

Should Human Stem Cells Be Used To Make Partly Human Chimeras?

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