A mosquito control inspector sprinkles larvicide in a storm drain in Miami Gardens, Fla., in an effort to stop the spread of Zika virus. Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Health Departments Cut Programs While Awaiting Zika Funding
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In some parts of the country, this might require bug spray. Steven Errico/Getty Images hide caption

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Who Should Be Worried About Zika And What Should They Do?
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Kelli Glenn holds a photo of her father while he was in the hospital. Meredith Rizzo/NPR hide caption

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Suddenly Paralyzed, 2 Men Struggle To Recover From Guillain-Barre
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This 3-month-old baby, born with microcephaly, is held by her father in Recife, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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How The Zika Virus Damages The Brain
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An aerial view of the Hiram Bithorn Stadium as Puerto Rico plays Dominican Republic at the Caribbean Series baseball tournament in San Juan, Puerto Rico in February. Ricardo Arduengo/AP hide caption

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Countries in Latin America have a range of laws regarding abortion, from completely prohibited to no restrictions. Above: Women in Brazil (at left) demonstrate for abortion rights; a woman at a march in Paraguay (at right) holds a poster reading "If Abortion is Not Wrong, Then Nothing Is Wrong." Christophe Simon and Norberto Duarte/Getty Images hide caption

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Tracy Smith, 38, and her children Hazel, 8, and Finley, 5, at their home in Houston. Smith is pregnant with twins and says she's a little more worried than usual about the approach of mosquito season. Carrie Feibel/Houston Public Media hide caption

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In Houston, Pregnant Women And Their Doctors Weigh Risks Of Zika
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Key Haven, a Florida neighborhood about a mile east of Key West, is where a test of Oxitec's genetically engineered mosquitoes might take place later this year. Some neighbors have strongly dissented — at public meetings and via yard signs. Nancy Klingener/WLRN hide caption

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Florida Keys Weigh Options For Battling Mosquitoes And Zika
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Nadja Bezerra carries her 4-month-old daughter, Alice, who was born with microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil. Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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How To Fight Zika When Your Country Is In Trouble: Improvise
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Scientists Say It's Time To End 'Parachute Research'
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More than 20,000 babies in the U.S. were born with congenital rubella syndrome during an outbreak of rubella in 1964-65. A vaccine developed in 1969 helped curb the virus's spread but hasn't eliminated it worldwide. Public Health Image Library/CDC hide caption

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Lessons From Rubella Suggest Zika's Impact Could Linger
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Standing water and abandoned tires make Houston's Fifth Ward hospitable for mosquitoes. Courtesy of Anna Grove Photography hide caption

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Houston Prepares Now For Zika's Potential Arrival This Summer
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Dr. Danielle Cruz attends to 4-month-old Davi Lucas Francisca da Paz, held by his mother, Eliane Francisca, in an examination room at the Institute of Integral Medicine Hospital in Recife, Brazil. Catherine Osborn/for NPR hide caption

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The Poignant Cry Of Babies With Birth Defects Linked to Zika
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A medical researcher prepares tests for various diseases including Zika. Arnulfo Franco/AP hide caption

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How Best To Test For Zika Virus?
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Mariel Mohns and Mustafa Rasheed are working in a University of Wisconsin lab that's trying to figure out how Zika virus could be damaging fetuses. Courtesy of Kristi L. Hall hide caption

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Scientists Report In Real Time On Challenging Zika Research
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A woman who is six months pregnant shows a photo of her ultrasound at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, on Wednesday. Scientists are trying to figure out how Zika virus may be affecting fetuses. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Study Finds Multiple Problems In Fetuses Exposed To Zika Virus
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