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Code Switch is tackling your trickiest questions about race relations. amathers/iStock hide caption

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How To Talk Race With Your Family: Ask Code Switch

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Make America Dinner Again guest Affan Khokhar (left, seated) talks with hosts Tria Chang and Justine Lee (front right, seated) after the dinner as guests (from left to right) Afam Agbodike, Walter Rodriguez and Nick Tucker continue their conversation. Sonia Paul for NPR hide caption

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Sonia Paul for NPR

Political Perspectives Are The Main Course At These Dinner Gatherings

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In the first of three conversations about President Barack Obama's racial legacy, Code Switch asks how much was race or racism drove the way the first black president was treated and how he governed. Richie Pope for NPR hide caption

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Richie Pope for NPR

Obama's Legacy: Diss-ent or Diss-respect?

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It's likely that Barack Obama will be known not only as the first black president, but also as the first president of everybody's race. Many Americans and people beyond the U.S. borders have projected their multicultural selves onto the president. Chelsea Beck/NPR hide caption

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Chelsea Beck/NPR

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Antwan Burns-Jones, 31 (from left), William Moore, 35, and David Lee, 23, add a basketball to the memorial for Tyshawn Lee, 9, who was fatally shot in Chicago's Gresham neighborhood. Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images hide caption

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Chicago Tribune/TNS via Getty Images

Amid Violence, Chicago Parents Try To Inoculate Their Sons Against Fear

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