This 3-month-old baby, born with microcephaly, is held by her father in Recife, Brazil. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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How The Zika Virus Damages The Brain

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Angelica Pereira feeds her daughter Luiza, who was born with microcephaly, at her mother's house in Santa Cruz do Capibaribe, Brazil. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Zika Virus Can Cause Brain Defects In Babies, CDC Confirms

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Nadja Bezerra carries her 4-month-old daughter, Alice, who was born with microcephaly, in Recife, Brazil. Dado Galdieri/Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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How To Fight Zika When Your Country Is In Trouble: Improvise

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A baby born with microcephaly in Brazil is examined by a neurologist. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Zika Is Linked To Microcephaly, Health Agencies Confirm

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A pregnant woman gets an ultrasound to monitor for the birth defect microcephaly, in Guatemala City last month. Johan Ordonez/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Pregnant Women May Be Able To Get Answers About Zika Earlier

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Dr. Danielle Cruz attends to 4-month-old Davi Lucas Francisca da Paz, held by his mother, Eliane Francisca, in an examination room at the Institute of Integral Medicine Hospital in Recife, Brazil. Catherine Osborn/for NPR hide caption

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The Poignant Cry Of Babies With Birth Defects Linked to Zika

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A woman who is six months pregnant shows a photo of her ultrasound at the IMIP hospital in Recife, Pernambuco state, Brazil, on Wednesday. Scientists are trying to figure out how Zika virus may be affecting fetuses. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Study Finds Multiple Problems In Fetuses Exposed To Zika Virus

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Mosquito larvae fill the cup of stale water that entomologist Luis Hernandez dips from a stack of old tires in a suburb of San Juan, Puerto Rico. Greg Allen/NPR hide caption

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Puerto Rico Races To Stop Zika's Mosquitoes Before Rains Begin

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Previous experience with dengue outbreaks in Puerto Rico has shown that even small amounts of standing water — as in the vases of cemeteries — can serve as breeding areas for the mosquitoes that carry dengue and Zika. Pan American Health Organization/Flickr hide caption

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With CDC Help, Puerto Rico Aims To Get Ahead Of Zika

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Why Scientists Hope To Inject Some People With Zika Virus

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Marcia Andrade, an agent from Brazil's Ministry of Health, interviews Camila Alves, 22. A friend holds Alves' 2-month-old daughter. Catherine Osborn for NPR hide caption

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Disease Detectives In Brazil Go Door-To-Door To Solve Zika Mystery

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Protected from bites by a mosquito net, this pregnant woman, in her second trimester, came into the hospital in Cucuta, Colombia, with symptoms of Zika. A blood test is being run to find out if she has the virus. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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All Eyes Are On Colombia: Will Zika Trigger A Spike In Microcephaly?

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Mylene Helena Ferraira of Recife, Brazil, carries her 5-month-old son, David Henrique Ferreira, who was born with microcephaly. She's returning home after a medical visit. Mario Tama/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC Arrives In Brazil To Investigate Zika Outbreak

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Born in December, Valentina Vitoria has microcephaly, the birth defect that causes an abnormally small head and can cause brain damage as well. Her mother is 32-year-old Fabiane Lopes. Lourdes Garcia-Navarro/NPR hide caption

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Moms And Infants Are Abandoned In Brazil Amid Surge In Microcephaly

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The man in the T-shirt is Paolo Sandoval, 42. His wife (seated, far right, in a white shirt) is Jessica Vivana Torres, 30. She's 15 weeks pregnant with their first child and came down with Zika three weeks ago. "I'm really worried about brain damage in the baby," says Sandoval, who listens intently as the ultrasound doctor describes the procedure. Nurith Aizenman/NPR hide caption

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With Zika Looming, What's It Like At A Maternity Clinic In Colombia?

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While some scientists seek ways to stop the spread of Zika by mosquitoes, others have received new funding from the National Institutes of Health to track the genes and habits of the virus itself. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Virus Profilers Race To Figure Out What Makes Zika Tick

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A patient suffering from Guillain-Barre syndrome recovers in a hospital ward in San Salvador on Jan. 27. Researchers are trying to determine whether there is a link between the disorder, which can cause weakness and paralysis, and the mosquito-borne Zika virus. Marvin Recinos /AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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CDC Sees Major Challenges Ahead In The Fight Against Zika

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Gleyse Kelly da Silva holds her daughter, Maria Giovanna, who was born with microcephaly. Felipe Dana/AP hide caption

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Zika-Linked Brain Damage In Infants May Be 'Tip Of The Iceberg'

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A researcher holds a container with female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes. This species transmits the Zika virus. Andre Penner/AP hide caption

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The Zika Virus Takes A Frightening Turn — And Raises Many Questions

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