Sen. Charles Grassley, R-Iowa (left), and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., are drafting legislation that would call for new penalties for selling synthetic opioids. Andrew Harnik/AP hide caption

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Lawmakers Consider Tough New Penalties For Opioid Crimes, Bucking Trend

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Hannah Berkowitz in her parents' home in West Hartford, Conn. Getting intensive in-home drug treatment is what ultimately helped her get back on track, she and her mom agree. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Home-Based Drug Treatment Program Costs Less And Works

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Allyson and Eddie, clients at the AAC Needle Exchange and Overdose Prevention Program in Cambridge, Mass., say they carry naloxone and try to never use drugs alone to reduce the risk of overdosing. Robin Lubbock for WBUR hide caption

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Robin Lubbock for WBUR

Fentanyl Adds A New Terror For People Abusing Opioids

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Christopher Milford in his apartment in East Boston, Mass. He quit abusing opioids after getting endocarditis three times. Jack Rodolico/NHPR hide caption

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Doctors Consider Ethics Of Costly Heart Surgery For People Addicted To Opioids

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A pair of studies show declines in opioid use by young people, including prescription use, intentional misuse and accidental poisonings. Gabe Souza/Portland Press Herald/Getty Images hide caption

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Michael Botticelli, former director of the Office of National Drug Control Policy, testifies during a Senate Judiciary Committee hearing on attacking America's epidemic of heroin and prescription drug abuse. Alex Brandon/AP hide caption

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Former Drug Czar Says GOP Health Bill Would Cut Access To Addiction Treatment

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German dictator Adolf Hitler gives a speech in October 1944. Author Norman Ohler says that Hitler's abuse of drugs increased "significantly" from the fall of 1941 until the winter of 1944. Keystone/Getty Images hide caption

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Author Says Hitler Was 'Blitzed' On Cocaine And Opiates During The War

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Maria Fabrizio for NPR

A Medicine That Blunts The Buzz Of Alcohol Can Help Drinkers Cut Back

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Dr. Joel Funari performs some 300 tooth extractions annually at his private practice in Devon, Pa.. He's part of a group of dentists reassessing opioid prescribing guidelines in the state. Elana Gordon / WHYY hide caption

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Elana Gordon / WHYY

Dentists Work To Ease Patients' Pain With Fewer Opioids

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A doctor at a Boston Medical Center clinic counsels a patient who has become addicted to opioid painkillers, and wants help kicking the habit. Addiction specialists say drugs like suboxone, which mitigates withdrawal symptoms, can greatly improve his odds of success. Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images hide caption

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Suzanne Kreiter/Boston Globe via Getty Images

(Left) Bob Hardin's son has fought alcoholism for decades. (Right) Cary Dixon's adult son has been in and out of treatment for opioid addiction. Sarah McCammon/NPR hide caption

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West Virginia Families Worry About Access To Addiction Treatment Under Trump

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Melissa Morris outside her home in Sterling, Colo. She quit using heroin in 2012, and now relies on the drug Suboxone to stay clean. She's also been helping to find treatment for some of the neighbors she used to sell drugs to. Luke Runyon/Harvest Public Media hide caption

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Rural Colorado's Opioid Connections Might Hold Clues To Better Treatment

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Seth Herald for NPR

A Peer Recovery Coach Walks The Front Lines Of America's Opioid Epidemic

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John Evard, 70, at the Las Vegas Recovery Center last July. Evard, a retired tax attorney, checked into a rehabilitation program to help him quit the prescribed opioids that had left him depressed, groggy and dependent on the drugs. Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News hide caption

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Heidi de Marco/Kaiser Health News

Opioids Can Derail The Lives Of Older People, Too

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'Drug Dealer, M.D.': Misunderstandings And Good Intentions Fueled Opioid Epidemic

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Life Expectancy In U.S. Drops For First Time In Decades, Report Finds

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Debbie Deagle holds a photo of her son Stephen and herself. Martha Bebinger/WBUR hide caption

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Organ Donations Spike In The Wake Of The Opioid Epidemic

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Kratom, seen in capsule form here, has been under review by the Drug Enforcement Administration for possible restriction. Photo illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images hide caption

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Photo illustration by Joe Raedle/Getty Images