In coal country, restoring streams like this one near Logan, W.Va., is a big business. But the practice remains controversial among some scientists. Courtesy of Canaan Valley Institute hide caption

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Courtesy of Canaan Valley Institute

Green tips of of a newly developed grain called Salish Blue are poking through older, dead stalks in Washington's Skagit Valley. Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix hide caption

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Eilís O'Neill/KUOW/EarthFix

A man crosses a bridge over the Poudre River, in Fort Collins, Colo. The picturesque river is the latest prize in the West's water wars, where wilderness advocates usually line up against urban and industrial development. Brennan Linsley/AP hide caption

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Brennan Linsley/AP

A view of the beach known as "La Selva," part of the Northeast Ecological Corridor reserve, in Luquillo, Puerto Rico. Andres Leighton/AP hide caption

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Andres Leighton/AP

Grass-Roots Fight To Protect Puerto Rico's Coast Scores Environmental Prize

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The village of Hoosick Falls, N.Y., sits along the Hoosick River in eastern New York. Elevated levels of a suspected carcinogen known as PFOA were found in the village's well water, which is now filtered. Hansi Lo Wang/NPR hide caption

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Hansi Lo Wang/NPR

Elevated Levels Of Suspected Carcinogen Found In States' Drinking Water

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