Shelia Mendoza says she's not looking for a livelihood out of Liberty Mobility, but a little extra cash and some new friends to talk to. M.L. Schultze/WKSU hide caption

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M.L. Schultze/WKSU

Ride Hailing In Rural America: Like Uber With A Neighborly Feel

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Wang Fei, 35, from southwest China's Chongqing region, drove cars for Didi Chuxing, China's main ride-hailing service, from last July until January, when new local rules banned out-of-town cars and drivers, and Didi cut bonuses to drivers. Anthony Kuhn/NPR hide caption

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Anthony Kuhn/NPR

In China, As In The U.S., The Fight Over Ride Hailing Is Local

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Juno CEO Talmon Marco talks with driver Fara Louis Jeune. The company recruited drivers by looking at Uber cars with the highest ratings. Juno hide caption

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Juno

Uber Competitor In NYC Promises Drivers Benefits, Even Employee Status

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A Lyft van sits outside the Austin Convention Center in March, during the 2016 SXSW Festival. The ride-hailing company, along with its competitor Uber, has now vowed to "pause" operations in the city, after Austin voters sided against the ride-hailing apps in a dispute over regulations. Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW hide caption

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Hutton Supancic/Getty Images for SXSW

Jesse Vega checks out a vehicle at an Uber "Work On Demand" recruitment event March 10 in South Los Angeles. The company is researching ways to get rid of its surge pricing, a feature that drivers like but that can make costs unpredictable for consumers. Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Ralston/AFP/Getty Images

Uber Plans To Kill Surge Pricing, Though Drivers Say It Makes Job Worth It

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