2016 election 2016 election

Robert Mueller, the Justice Department's pick as special counsel in the investigation into Russia's role in the 2016 elections, has been cleared of any conflicts of interests related to the work of his former law firm. Evan Vucci/AP hide caption

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Evan Vucci/AP

Then-FBI Director James Comey testified in front of the Senate Judiciary Committee during an oversight hearing earlier this month before he was fired by President Trump. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Eric Thayer/Getty Images

Former FBI Director Robert Mueller testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee during the annual open hearing on worldwide threats on March 12, 2013. Mueller has been named special counsel to investigate Russian interference in the 2016 election. Susan Walsh/AP hide caption

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Susan Walsh/AP

Former FBI Director Mueller Appointed As Special Counsel To Oversee Russia Probe

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Senate Judiciary Committee member Ben Sasse, a Republican, listens to witnesses Monday during a subcommittee hearing on Russian interference. Eric Thayer/Getty Images hide caption

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Sen. Sasse: Comey Firing 'Troubling' Amid 'Crisis Of Public Trust'

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The Anti-Defamation League counts 541 incidents of anti-Semitism since the year began. That includes vandalism of Jewish burial grounds, including the Mount Carmel Cemetery in Philadelphia in February. Jacqueline Larma/AP hide caption

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Jacqueline Larma/AP

Former FBI agent Clint Watts testifies before the Senate Intelligence Committee on Thursday in Washington, D.C. Win McNamee/Getty Images hide caption

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Win McNamee/Getty Images

How Russian Twitter Bots Pumped Out Fake News During The 2016 Election

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Uncertainty about the future can raise stress levels, psychologists say. Here, students in Charlotte, N.C., hold hands during a Sept. 21 protest after Keith Lamont Scott was shot and killed by a police officer. Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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Nicholas Kamm/AFP/Getty Images

Outside Trump Tower in New York City, health care justice advocates and other grass-roots groups gathered to demand that Trump not agree to repeal the Affordable Care Act. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

The empty stage for Democratic presidential nominee Hillary Clinton on election night at the Jacob K. Javits Convention Center. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images

Democrats Try To Find A Future Post-Obama With Fault Lines Along Economics, Race

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President Trump hosts Democratic and Republican congressional leaders in the State Dining Room of the White House on Monday. Bloomberg via Getty Images hide caption

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Bloomberg via Getty Images

Former President Bill Clinton plays with balloons onstage at the end of the fourth day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center in Philadelphia in July. Aaron P. Bernstein/Getty Images hide caption

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Latino voters go to the polls for early voting at the Miami-Dade Government Center on October 21, 2004 in Miami, Florida. A key constituency in Florida, many wondered how conservative Latinos would vote after now President-elect Trump's remarks on immigration. Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images hide caption

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Gaston De Cardenas/Getty Images

Latinos Will Never Vote For A Republican, And Other Myths About Hispanics From 2016

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San Francisco high school students protest in opposition to Donald Trump's presidential victory. Protests like it have been springing up all over the country, and a women's protest is planned for Jan. 21. Eric Risberg/AP hide caption

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Eric Risberg/AP

Protesters demonstrate in Philadelphia last week. Republican Donald Trump is assured of a victory, unless there is a massive — and totally unexpected — defection by the electors pledged to support him. Mark Makela/Getty Images hide caption

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Mark Makela/Getty Images

5 Things You Should Know About The Electoral College

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Plenty of Trump opponents are begging electors to vote against Trump. But it's hard to see that effort being very successful. Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images hide caption

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Pacific Press/LightRocket via Getty Images

U.S. intelligence agencies charge that operatives with ties to Russia and Vladimir Putin's (above) administration hacked private Clinton and Democratic National Committee emails during the presidential election and released them via WikiLeaks. Darko Vojinovic/AP hide caption

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Darko Vojinovic/AP

President Obama meets with members of his national security team and cybersecurity advisers in February. Homeland security adviser Lisa Monaco and Office of Management and Budget Director Shaun Donovan are at right. Mandel Ngan/AFP/Getty Images hide caption

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NPR reporter Asma Khalid during a live broadcast. She covered demographics and the 2016 campaign. Ariel Zambelich/NPR hide caption

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Ariel Zambelich/NPR

Reporter's Notebook: What It Was Like As A Muslim To Cover The Election

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